Ready to Read Stories (Chair Not Included)

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The book does a good job of illustrating how anxiety can become overwhelming and teaches kids how they can take charge of their anxiety.

Disney's Moana

Written by Nicole C. Kear, illustrated by Tracy Dockray. Seven-year-old Veronica wants to help her classmate Maya conquer her fear of bugs, which is preventing her from playing at recess. Veronica comes up with a step-by-step plan that starts with drawing a spider. A cute hedgehog turns down ice-skating and playing in the snow with his animal friends because of his worries. He could fall and hurt himself. Anxious about school, soccer practice, and monsters under his bed, baby bear worried day and night, despite his family telling him to stop worrying.

But when his mom began encouraging him to talk about and even draw out his worries, the feelings began to subside. Sanchez, illustrated by Jess Golden. The brilliant final page requests that kids draw a picture of themselves without worries. Arnold, illustrated by Charles Santoso. But readers with autism may relate to chatter about itchy and uncomfortable clothes, sticking with routines, and only having friends who are grown-ups.

In the first book of a series, best friends Rip and Red have just started fifth grade. Their common passion: basketball. Am I a Bully? Written by Hope Gilchrist, illustrated by Zoe Jordon. Toby makes his friends laugh when he teases a classmate over his weird clothes. This independently published paperback helps children recognize when teasing crosses the line into bullying.

This sweet story prepares kids for how short-lived teasing can be. On the first day of school, Victoria picks on Chrysanthemum because she has the same name as a flower, and Chrysanthemum wilts under the ridicule. Then the students learn that a teacher has a similar name, and all of a sudden Chrysanthemum is cool. Published by Mulberry Books.

Particularly good for an anxious or literal child, this rhyming book helps distinguish between teasing and bullying. Published by Boys Town Press. In a fast-paced chapter book that will appeal to reluctant readers, Marley thinks seventh grade will be boring until he draws attention from the school bully. Digger pushes Marley down in the hallway, and the drama unfolds.

Bonus: If your child is a fan of Star Wars, there are loads of references. Levine Books. She tells him that her mom has depression too, and she sees a therapist to help her feel better. An actress on TV shows such as Orange Is the New Black , Guerrero shares the heartbreaking story of her Colombian parents being deported when she was She also reveals how she battled depression, and had suicidal thoughts in her early 20s.

Back to Front and Upside Down!

Written and illustrated by Claire Alexander. This sweet picture book follows Stan, a puppy, and his animal classmates. When he finally does, he learns that with help — and lots of practice — he can succeed. This inspirational chapter book captures the challenges students with dyslexia face daily, not just in reading but in self-esteem. The main character, Ally, has been able to hide her inability to read in every school — until now. Published by Puffin Books. In this sturdy book with beautiful heart-shaped cutouts, a girl explains that her heart is full of feelings.

Each spread focuses on a different emotion, such as happiness, bravery, and fear. Their common passion: basketball. Am I a Bully?

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Written by Hope Gilchrist, illustrated by Zoe Jordon. Toby makes his friends laugh when he teases a classmate over his weird clothes. This independently published paperback helps children recognize when teasing crosses the line into bullying. This sweet story prepares kids for how short-lived teasing can be.

On the first day of school, Victoria picks on Chrysanthemum because she has the same name as a flower, and Chrysanthemum wilts under the ridicule. Then the students learn that a teacher has a similar name, and all of a sudden Chrysanthemum is cool. Published by Mulberry Books.

Particularly good for an anxious or literal child, this rhyming book helps distinguish between teasing and bullying. Published by Boys Town Press.


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In a fast-paced chapter book that will appeal to reluctant readers, Marley thinks seventh grade will be boring until he draws attention from the school bully. Digger pushes Marley down in the hallway, and the drama unfolds. Bonus: If your child is a fan of Star Wars, there are loads of references. Levine Books. She tells him that her mom has depression too, and she sees a therapist to help her feel better.

An actress on TV shows such as Orange Is the New Black , Guerrero shares the heartbreaking story of her Colombian parents being deported when she was She also reveals how she battled depression, and had suicidal thoughts in her early 20s. Back to Front and Upside Down! Written and illustrated by Claire Alexander. This sweet picture book follows Stan, a puppy, and his animal classmates.


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When he finally does, he learns that with help — and lots of practice — he can succeed. This inspirational chapter book captures the challenges students with dyslexia face daily, not just in reading but in self-esteem. The main character, Ally, has been able to hide her inability to read in every school — until now. Published by Puffin Books. In this sturdy book with beautiful heart-shaped cutouts, a girl explains that her heart is full of feelings.

Each spread focuses on a different emotion, such as happiness, bravery, and fear. This is when my heart is sad. Seuss, illustrated by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher. This little-known Dr. Seuss story gives young kids a groundwork for describing their feelings, normalizing the experience of having multiple emotions.

Bonus: It will also help toddlers and preschoolers learn colors. The witty illustrations in this book may be even more powerful than the text. An astronaut in space holds a picture of his family.

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A wrestler cries in the locker room. A tattooed biker regrets running over a squirrel. The final image of a father and son is particularly heartwarming. But then the color palette of the illustrations changes as Sophie cries a little and lets the outdoors comfort her. This plus-page activity book uses writing and drawing to help kids work through their emotions. Published by Art With Heart. This book explains, in realistic but reassuring language, why people die and how hard it can be to say goodbye. Here are my thoughts and opinions on this topic I believe far too much "normalization" of some behaviors DOES cause harm to children.

I fully agree with you, Charles. But, you'll notice that Common Sense Media is deleting the comments of those who share our opinions. Thank you, Regan! I agree with you! I also have a lot of librarians for friends and relatives. I do share some parents' fears, and there are certain books I found uncomfortable reading.

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For one, The Microbe Hunters. It's an excellent, fascinating story of the origins of the discovery of germs and their connection to illness. It uses a lot of racist language, though. When I read it, it was like a constant slap in the face: I found it distracting. I worked for the publisher, and suggested a re-edit. I haven't read the new edition. I wonder if they did it? That book would be wonderful for high schoolers if it were possible to not be distracted by the language.

I certainly don't agree with banning the book, only that a fascinating story is unnecessarily, in my opinion, made inaccessible.